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The Vibration Spectrum

Sound, light and heat are all forms of vibration. Each field has its own spectrum or scale of vibration. Sound is an impulse of air striking the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. Light is that action wherein objects are made visible. Heat is another force, similar to sound and light, in that it has a rate of vibration also. Each of these natural actions have their spectra occupying niches in the huge vibrational spectrum of nature.

Modern science indicates that all bodies, unless at the absolute zero of temperature assigned by physicists as minus 273 degrees Centigrade-emit vibrations. Most of these vibrations are not visible to the eye, sensitive to the touch or audible to the ear. The frequencies, or rates of vibration, vary from a few cycles per second to millions of cycles per second and include everything from sound waves to gamma and cosmic rays.

A crude illustration of the huge vibration spectrum may be made by drawing a pencil line about a foot long. At the left end of this line mark an (X). This point illustrates the rate of vibration of the musical note “B,” four octaves below middle “C” on the piano scale, or thirty cycles per second. Move to the right on the pencil line about a half inch from (X) and mark (Y). This point represents a frequency of 5, 120 cycles per second, the high musical note ”E,” four  ctaves above middle “C.” As the rate of vibration rises above approximately 16,000 cycles per second-the pitch of some squeaks-it ceases to be audible to the human ear. We take this approximate half inch section on the pencil line to represent the sound spectrum niche of the major vibrational scale.

From the point (Y) move to the right on the pencil line-to establish the beginning of the electro-magnetic spectrum-about three inches, marking the point as (Z). This point represents the beginning of the modern radio spectrum. Moving to the right on the pencil line another three inches will approximate the radio spectrum, this right hand point representing frequencies of about sixty thousand kilocycles and wavelengths of five meters or less.

Again move to the right on the pencil line, after leaving a gap of about an inch to represent the lapping of the short wave radio band and the frequencies of the infra-red and heat rays, the center of which represents the rate of vibration of the color yellow, or approximately a rate of vibration of 500,000,000,000,000 cycles per second. In this spectrum is the frequency range where the human eye is able to directly detect the electro-magnetic vibrations we know as light and color. The eye continues this ability until the rate of vibration increases above that of the color violet.

Move to the right on the pencil line another quarter inch and mark the point (A). This quarter inch section represents the ultra-violet ray spectrum on the edge of the x-ray division. From this point (A) to the extreme right hand end of the pencil line represents the several segments of; first, the x-rays then the ,gamma rays and finally, the cosmic rays.

In the spectra of gamma and cosmic rays the frequency is so tremendous that a huge line of figures would be necessary to represent the rate. The wave length at these frequencies is of the order of one ten thousandth of one ten millionth of a millimeter or less.

Observations indicate that the earth’s atmosphere is permeated with high frequency radiation of tremendous penetrating power. Although this force is more intense at great heights than at the earth’s surface, it is just as intense at night as during the day. At sea level this radiation breaks up about 1.4 atoms in every cubic centimeter of air per second, so it cannot be denied that millions of atoms are broken up in every human body every second. This is the source of distinct biological and in turn, psychological, changes in people. Far more penetrating than any other type of vibration it has- been found that the most penetrating portion of these rays will pass through sixteen feet of lead.

It is only very recently that an analysis of the biological and psychological effects of these rays has been attempted by exact science. However, the effect of this energy has been observed by man for centuries. Simple physics illustrates with a prism how a small segment of sunlight can be separated into the seven primary colors. On the angle of refraction of the sun-rays through the prism depends the particular color in the spectrum.

Experiments indicate that a similar type of refraction process occurs through the planets in their relation to the Sun and Earth. Radiation on the surface of the Earth is composed of: first, the rays of the Sun which are refracted by the Earth’s magnetism and atmosphere; second, the refracted rays of the Sun, each changed in a particular manner through the angle in which they are reflected from the planets; and, the radiation of each planet. This condition indicates that the frequency of solar radiation is much broader than just the light and heat spectra, covering the entire electro-magnetic spectrum from radio waves to cosmic rays. We shall now proceed to examine the effects of this radiation in the light of economics and mass psychology

Sound, light and heat are all forms of vibration. Each field has its own spectrum or scale of vibration. Sound is an impulse of air striking the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. Light is that action wherein objects are made visible. Heat is another force, similar to sound and light, in that it has a rate of vibration also. Each of these natural actions have their spectra occupying niches in the huge vibrational spectrum of nature.

Modern science indicates that all bodies, unless at the absolute zero of temperature assigned by physicists as minus 273 degrees Centigrade-emit vibrations. Most of these vibrations are not visible to the eye, sensitive to the touch or audible to the ear. The frequencies, or rates of vibration, vary from a few cycles per second to millions of cycles per second and include everything from sound waves to gamma and cosmic rays.

A crude illustration of the huge vibration spectrum may be made by drawing a pencil line about a foot long. At the left end of this line mark an (X). This point illustrates the rate of vibration of the musical note “B,” four octaves below middle “C” on the piano scale, or thirty cycles per second. Move to the right on the pencil line about a half inch from (X) and mark (Y). This point represents a frequency of 5, 120 cycles per second, the high musical note ”E,” four  ctaves above middle “C.” As the rate of vibration rises above approximately 16,000 cycles per second-the pitch of some squeaks-it ceases to be audible to the human ear. We take this approximate half inch section on the pencil line to represent the sound spectrum niche of the major vibrational scale.

From the point (Y) move to the right on the pencil line-to establish the beginning of the electro-magnetic spectrum-about three inches, marking the point as (Z). This point represents the beginning of the modern radio spectrum. Moving to the right on the pencil line another three inches will approximate the radio spectrum, this right hand point representing frequencies of about sixty thousand kilocycles and wavelengths of five meters or less.

Again move to the right on the pencil line, after leaving a gap of about an inch to represent the lapping of the short wave radio band and the frequencies of the infra-red and heat rays, the center of which represents the rate of vibration of the color yellow, or approximately a rate of vibration of 500,000,000,000,000 cycles per second. In this spectrum is the frequency range where the human eye is able to directly detect the electro-magnetic vibrations we know as light and color. The eye continues this ability until the rate of vibration increases above that of the color violet.

Move to the right on the pencil line another quarter inch and mark the point (A). This quarter inch section represents the ultra-violet ray spectrum on the edge of the x-ray division. From this point (A) to the extreme right hand end of the pencil line represents the several segments of; first, the x-rays then the ,gamma rays and finally, the cosmic rays.

In the spectra of gamma and cosmic rays the frequency is so tremendous that a huge line of figures would be necessary to represent the rate. The wave length at these frequencies is of the order of one ten thousandth of one ten millionth of a millimeter or less.

Observations indicate that the earth’s atmosphere is permeated with high frequency radiation of tremendous penetrating power. Although this force is more intense at great heights than at the earth’s surface, it is just as intense at night as during the day. At sea level this radiation breaks up about 1.4 atoms in every cubic centimeter of air per second, so it cannot be denied that millions of atoms are broken up in every human body every second. This is the source of distinct biological and in turn, psychological, changes in people. Far more penetrating than any other type of vibration it has- been found that the most penetrating portion of these rays will pass through sixteen feet of lead.

It is only very recently that an analysis of the biological and psychological effects of these rays has been attempted by exact science. However, the effect of this energy has been observed by man for centuries. Simple physics illustrates with a prism how a small segment of sunlight can be separated into the seven primary colors. On the angle of refraction of the sun-rays through the prism depends the particular color in the spectrum.

Experiments indicate that a similar type of refraction process occurs through the planets in their relation to the Sun and Earth. Radiation on the surface of the Earth is composed of: first, the rays of the Sun which are refracted by the Earth’s magnetism and atmosphere; second, the refracted rays of the Sun, each changed in a particular manner through the angle in which they are reflected from the planets; and, the radiation of each planet. This condition indicates that the frequency of solar radiation is much broader than just the light and heat spectra, covering the entire electro-magnetic spectrum from radio waves to cosmic rays. We shall now proceed to examine the effects of this radiation in the light of economics and mass psychology.

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