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Gann’s Annual Forecasts – Part Four By Chuck Carpino

In December 14, 1920, Gann issued his 1921 Annual Forecasts for the stock market. He thought the market would not have the wide fluctuations that had occurred in the past two years. Under his “Important Points of the Year,” he wrote the following advice: ‘The low point for the general market will be reached between the fifth and the tenth of February, although some stocks will make low around the 12 to 14. The spring campaign will start in February and will culminate between April 28 and May 3. You should certainly sell out long stocks on this advance, as the month of May indicates serious declines.

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Achieving The Ultimate High: Part II By Eric Hadik

In this article, I attempted to clarify the application of Elliott Wave in the stock market and offer a well substantiated argument for a higher Dow into late August/early September (the date for a high has been narrowed down to August 31 or September I, 1989). Much from that article was omitted and therefore left the reader with some very understandable questions which I will attempt to dispel in this subsequent article.

More than five months have elapsed since its writing and time, as always. has been the true test for this speculation. The yearly and monthly wave counts remain intact and are presently being reinforced by the weekly and daily action of the industrials.

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Treasury Bonds a Longer Term Perspective By Robert R. Lussier

In today’s volatile markets, speculators naturally focus on very short-term market movements. However, they forget that what happens in the present is directly related to a bigger picture that deserves more attention. Such a situation now exists in the treasury bond market. It has apparently been next to impossible to decipher the intentions of the Fed and even more difficult to interpret the significance of the plethora of economic data which bombard the market day by day.

Yet the technical picture, in terms of both patterns and cycles, is one that has exhibited exemplary clarity since the beginning of this decade. The cyclic profile has been exceptional at both extremes, i.e. tops and bottoms. Every three years, bonds have roughed and crested right on schedule because of two separate three-year cycles that have alternately punctuated both major highs and lows as regularly and accurately as the movement of a pendulum.

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The Gann Wheel on May 1989 Coffee By Jim Purucker and Pat Reda

In chapter three of W.D. Gann’s book, “How to Make Profits in Commodities,” Gann states, “Time is the most important factor of all and not until sufficient time has expired does any big move start up or down. Time must be allowed for accumulation or distribution before the trend can change.”

Once you are aware of when these natural timing points occur, the next step is to watch for the G-A-N-N2 Buy/Sell price pattern to form. This pattern allows plenty of time (3-4 weeks) to visually see accumulation or distribution to take place.

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New Concepts In Multi-dimensional Trading Systems By Marcus S. Robinson

Trading stocks and commodities has become a very exciting yet volatile business. Professional traders around the world have searched out a variety of trading systems in the hopes of gaining a decisive edge in their hard won trading abilities. Over the past few decades a number of systems have survived this inexhaustible search for the financial holy grail. Many professionals have found it necessary to combine two or more trading systems to compensate for the inherent weakness in a single system approach (and I count myself among them). Continue reading New Concepts In Multi-dimensional Trading Systems By Marcus S. Robinson

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The Jupiter Effect on the Stock Market By Bill Meridian

I began studying technical analysis in the mid-1960’s, a time during which there was great excitement and interest in the stock market. In graduate school in the early 1970’s, I read all of the quantitative studies done on price movements. What caused stock prices to move?

Was it news, was it fundamental developments in the economy, was it political developments? All of these studies came up with the same result. That is, there was no statistically significant correlation between market price movements and any of the previously-mentioned items. In fact, one of the stronger correlations, although it was not even statistically significant, was the relationship between inflation-adjusted earnings and the S&P500 (the highest correlation that was found was between stock averages and the Washington Senators baseball team batting average over three consecutive years, but we all know that this was simply a random occurrence).

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Achieving the Ultimate High By Eric S. Hadik

Since October 1987, numerous theories have been offered to explain the action of the stock market and subsequently predict its future course. Conflicting projections ranging from as low as 400 to as high as 6000+ Dow, serve to confuse the public and often alienate them from stock market investing. The resultant quandary can be alleviated by first categorizing and then validating each theory according to the rules on which it is based. Ironically, the rules claimed as the foundation for each are identical and are clearly presented in a single text, The Elliott Wave Principle.

Reinforcing these rules with the use of common sense, I intend to dispel the notion that the Elliott Wave theory is highly esoteric realm of technical analysis and to encourage even the most basic technician to explore its potential.

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Silver Astrology and the Golden Mean Ratio By James W. Brock

For the past twelve years I have Si the past twelve years I been researching the correlation between the price of silver and the geometric relationships of the planets. My research has proven to me that at least 80 percent of the bull and bear markets can be predicted by astronomical patterns. One of the fascinating things I’ve discovered about the movement of the planets is their perfection to mathematical order. My type of astrological based market analysis is more complex than most astrology-based systems for I incorporate certain mathematical principles with planetary relationships, specifically the Golden Mean Ratio.

The Golden Mean Ratio or Phi (1.618 or .618) is a mathematical ratio found throughout nature, and is used by many market technicians in their predictions for future market behavior. Continue reading Silver Astrology and the Golden Mean Ratio By James W. Brock

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A Glimpse Into “Market Waves” By Robert Saperstein and Thomas Gautschi

Complementary technical tools are an important adjunct to the primary Elliott Wave analysis that is used to generate trades. This was demonstrated in our previous article on Compuwave in the August/September 1988 G&EW, where standard computer generated technical studies are used to help confirm the current Elliott Wave count. Now with the development of the widely used Market Profile analysis, new insights into analytical and trading techniques can be gained in conjunction with Elliott Wave analysis, to form the concept of “Market Waves”. This article will illustrate one particular application as it was used in the generation of day trades in the Bond market.

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Equivolume: A Different Diagnosis By Richard W. Arms, Jr.

I recently spent a of long and tense hours at the hospital bedside of a close relative. I noticed that a nurse would appear in the room at regular intervals, chart in hand and instruments at the ready. Her primary duty was to measure and record the patient’s vital signs. She would rapidly check to ascertain whether the patient was still living, and if so, how well. Having noted and recorded pulse, blood pressure, respiration and temperature, she would as quickly move on to see if the patient in the next room’s signs remained vital.

In that I have yet to lose my interest in attractive nurses, and charts have long held a fascination for me, albeit my experience is more with stock charts than medical charts, I reflected upon this periodic hospital ritual. The nurse’s job appeared to be primarily one of recording data for the doctors who would, I hoped, turn the information into both a diagnosis and a prognosis. Their ability to look at all of the available data, combined with their skill and experience over many years, were the key to the decisions they would be called upon to make.

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