Mars: The War Lord

$18.72

  • Format: PDF
  • Pages: 124
  • Published Date: 1970
Category:

Description

In Mars: The War Lord, Leo explains the power of Mars over the zodiac-and over the human spirit.Some consider him the father of modern astrology: in the early 20th century, prominent British astrology Alan Leo opened up the secrets of divination by the stars to the general public with his line of “Modern Astrology” manuals, a popular series of books that set off a craze for horoscopes that continues to this day.

Introduction:

MANY of those into whose hands it is hoped this book will come, will find the idea that there is any connection between the planets and man, a startling one. For it is entirely contrary to accepted notions.

Astronomers of our day have unanimously declared Astrology a baseless superstition, and the plain man in the street naturally presumes that since they study the heavens they must know. A specialist however – and the astronomer is a specialist as regards his study, which deals with the physical constitution of the universe – a specialist is admittedly ill-qualified to pronounce judgment on matters outside his particular province, albeit he is often too willing to do so.

And astronomers of our day do not study Astrology, showing themselves woefully ignorant of the subject in the few allusions they do make. KEPLER, whose Three Laws are the very foundation of modern astronomy, was a man of a different stamp: although he said some very sharp things about the astrologers of his time, he attested the fundamental truths of Astrology in the following remarkable passage:– AN UNFAILING EXPERIENCE OF THE EXCITEMENT OF SUBLUNARY NATURES BY THE CONJUNCTIONS AND ASPECTS OF THE PLANETS, HAS INSTRUCTED AND COMPELLED MY UNWILLING BELIEF. From which we see that our astronomers, who have not studied the subject, are in manifest disagreement with their Father, who had.

But there is another reason for the prevalent disbelief in Astrology, and one more creditable to human nature that the vanity of modern science which presumes that what it has not noticed cannot therefore exist. There is in man a wholesome instinct that refuses to believe that he is merely a puppet attached to the invisible strings of planetary influence, whose bidding he is willy-nilly forced to execute. And it is surely a healthier sign for humanity that Astrology should have been ignored, than that it should exercise the baneful sway which marked its power in the early Middle Ages before astronomy had emerged from its geocentric swaddling clothes, and the astrologer was a personage to be dreaded and placated. When we remember that science, of whatever kind, exists only for the benefit of mankind, it is easy to understand the fall of Astrology when once its adherents had perverted it to their own personal ends.

Contents:

  • THE RISING STAR OF THE MATERIAL WORLD
  • THE CULMINATING STAR OF THE MATERIAL WORLD
  • THE SETTING OF THE STAR OF MATERIALITY